“I bought the HSI titanium tourmaline ionic flat iron and I was so impressed with it. It glides so smoothly down the hair without any tugs! The digital display screen lets me adjust the temperature without any problems, it heats up fast, and I love that it comes with a pretty purple pouch, glove, and argan-oil serum. I also own the digital HSI ceramic ionic flat iron from 2013, and it’s still going strong, but I do like the titanium iron better, and I see myself using for it for years to come. It leaves my hair shiny and soft!”

Hair breakage is an all too common problem, and even the most seasoned of hair stylists can slip up from time to time. That’s why LumaBella’s Keratin Duel Touch Hair Straightener features a unique smart heat sensor. This nifty little gadget can actually tell when there is too much heat for your hair, and will automatically adjust to a safer styling temperature!
The type of heat you use to style your hair makes a big difference in how healthy it will be. Our Xtava Pro-Satin Infrared Ceramic Flat Iron for Hair uses infrared heating technology, which heats hair from the inside out. Infrared technology is a game-changer for styling your hair because it allows heat to penetrate directly into the inner part of the hair strand, not just the outside layer. Infrared heating to the middle of the hair strand provides a more effective heat for styling and decreases damage to the outside of your hair. Infrared technology also stimulates negative ions in your hair that draw oils from the hair shaft to the surface; this helps lock in moisture and lock in your look, even in humid weather. Better heat = better hair health. Guess that’s not much of a secret after all, is it?

Early hair straightening systems relied on harsh chemicals that tended to damage the hair. In the 1870s, the French hairdresser Marcel Grateau introduced heated metal hair care implements such as hot combs to straighten hair. Madame C.J. Walker used combs with wider teeth and popularized their use together with her system of chemical scalp preparation and straightening lotions.[3] Her mentor Annie Malone is sometimes said to have patented the hot comb.[4] Heated metal implements slide more easily through the hair, reducing damage and dryness. Women in the 1960s sometimes used clothing irons to straighten their hair.


“This flat iron is amazing! It is so small, it almost looks like a flat iron for a doll. Don’t let the size fool you. I have medium-thick, naturally curly hair, and this iron had no problem getting all of my hair straight. If you are used to a flat iron, you should have no problem using this. This is the best flat iron for traveling, the gym, or stashing in your desk at work. I would highly recommend this flat iron.”

Turn Black Friday into Black Fri-YAY: Shop Now For Your Chance to Pick up A Free CHI Tote!November 20, 2018 9:42 amTurn Black Friday into Black Fri-YAY: Shop Now For Your Chance to Pick up A Free CHI Tote! - Give the gift of CHI this holiday season! Now is the perfect time to load up your cart because the first 500 shoppers get a FREE CHI TOTE with purchases of $100 and more.


When you apply heat to your hair, which is not a living thing, you’re essentially cooking it. And, just like food, it’s easy to overdo it. Short of actually searing your hair, you still run the risk of drying out each strand, which can lead to breakage and split ends over time. Every head of hair is different, and each type of hair has an optimal flat-iron temperature. Some locks need extremely high temperatures to relax — coarse hair or those with kinky hair need 380 degrees F or above. Others need hardly any heat at all — fine or damaged hair should be good below 300 degrees.
Brant Mayfield, who styles everyone from Diane von Furstenberg to Nicole Scherzinger, favors this glossy white flat iron. "It has digital single pass technology, which helps for smoothness and contains an eternal microchip that maintains an even temperature," he says. The angled edges and ceramic plates will keep your hair smooth and without kinks.
GHD’s “styler” is permanently set to 365 degrees Fahrenheit, which the company says is the highest temperature hair can tolerate before it becomes damaged. As a person who went from a dark brunette to blonde highlights, I can vouch for its straightening power on processed hair. And though I don’t typically think of “comfort” as a flat iron necessity, the springy hinge that connects the two plates really did make it easier to clamp and glide the tool down my hair with minimal effort.
×