Most mid-grade and high-end hair straighteners come with plates that are 1” or 1.5”. If you are looking at one that is 2”, 2.5”, or even bigger, steer clear immediately. Not only does larger plates make it easier for you to accidentally over-iron (and seriously damage) your hair, but they also make it more difficult to get all of the way down to your roots. For anyone with type 3 or type 4 hair, trying to use a large-sized flat iron would be far more trouble than it’s worth.
The Bio Ionic worked well on all of our testers’ hair, but it’s best on drier hair with a medium thickness. We spritzed testers’ hair with some keratin smoothing treatment, but the Bio Ionic did a lot of the heavy lifting to make our hair feel softer. The tool gets hot, but not too hot to grip, and it excels at creating the silky volume you want without making your hair pin-straight and flat. One tester put it perfectly: “[The Bio Ionic] is the Rumplestiltskin of hair straighteners. It’s turning straw into gold.”
Unlike the Bio Ionic’s handy digital temperature control, the Chi Air uses a small dial on the side of the tool that’s harder to read. The dial’s placement makes it not only more difficult to get an accurate reading, but also more prone to being hit by your hand and switching to a new temperature. That being said, most of our testers didn’t mind this minor inconvenience since they don’t expect to change the tool’s temperature often.

According to Jarman, you should never have to use both hands to clamp the iron down on your hair. You not only risk burning your fingers on the plate end, but this can pull at your hair and break it. High-quality, modern irons are designed to clamp together from the handle end only, so if you find that your iron requires pressure on both ends, it’s time to upgrade.


Most buyers were happy with their purchase of the Xtava, loving how well it worked on their natural hair, how quickly it straightens and cuts down on style time, and the extra features like the heat resistant bag. Everyone should be able to have straight, sleek hair as a style option no matter their hair type, and it's well-designed styling tools like the Xtava Pro Satin that make it possible.
T3’s white and rose gold flat iron seems too pretty to reliably function, but hey, sometimes miracles happen. There are four temperature settings ranging from 260 to 410 degrees, and the tool heats up in about a minute. Its ceramic plates are infused with tourmaline, a mineral said to make hair extra smooth because it emits negatively-charged ions. There’s no scientific evidence to support this, but my unscientific bathroom study found that this flat iron does indeed make my hair look shinier.
According to hair pro Christian Wood, if you want to make sure your hair stays in the place, use the GHD gold mini styler. “I prefer a small straightener that I can get really close to the roots to remove stubborn kinks and cow licks,” says Wood. The small straightener trick is probably how he nails the beauty looks of Tessa Thompson, Emily Ratajkowski, Rosie Huntington, and Olivia Munn.

GRAY HAIR AND BLACK IRON is also an effort to speak to yet another group of forgotten lifters: the garage gorillas and cellar dwellers of the world, who toil in anonymity in home gyms featuring plenty of black iron and not much else. The modern muscle media doesn't have much to say to these men - and may not even know that they exist. But they're there - and they're the backbone of the Iron Game. Always have been, and always will be. They're my heroes. And I wrote this book for them.
I ABSOLUTELY LOVE this hair straightener/curler. I was looking into buying the new TYME Iron that came out but found this one that was so similar and more than half the price. After seeing some reviews, I trusted it enough to purchase it. Got it in today and curled my hair (WITH my clip-on hair extensions) and it not only curls/straightens SO pretty but leaves hair nice and soft and silky AND therefore made my extensions blend in so so seamlessly. If you're looking for a new straightener/curler, I absolutely recommend!
STEAM INFUSED WITH ARGAN OIL OR PURE WATER PREVENTS HAIR DAMAGE: Designed with steam compartment that can be used for Argan Oil Serum or water, PureBlackMagic Steam Infusion Hair Straightener releases steam within 60 seconds of heating. The conditioning steam infuses moisture back into your hair, locking in natural oils and adding more shine to the finish.
I've used this product once as soon as I purchased it. I read really good reviews about it and since I already own an xtava blowdrier, which I LOVE, I decided to give this flat iron a shot. It is amazing. It heats up very quickly and Its really good for thick natural hair, which is the kind of hair I have. I first washed my hair and the blow dried it with the xtava blow drier using a comb attachment on it, and then I used the flat iron. I've uploaded pictures from the before, during, and the after product. I recommend it for natural
Size matters. With plates too big or too small, you’ll have to make multiple passes. This exposes your hair to high heat longer and increases the risk that you’ll do damage. According to Janine Jarman, owner and operator of acclaimed Hollywood salon Hairroin, a 1-inch-wide plate will do for most people, and if you want to use your iron for anything other than straightening, like creating curls or waves, you’ll need a 1-inch plate; anything larger won’t make the waves or curls tight enough. She also pointed out length is important too. “You need plates to be at least 3 inches long, or close to it, so you’re not spending a ton of time with small sections.”
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