According to Jarman, you should never have to use both hands to clamp the iron down on your hair. You not only risk burning your fingers on the plate end, but this can pull at your hair and break it. High-quality, modern irons are designed to clamp together from the handle end only, so if you find that your iron requires pressure on both ends, it’s time to upgrade.
Most buyers were happy with their purchase of the Xtava, loving how well it worked on their natural hair, how quickly it straightens and cuts down on style time, and the extra features like the heat resistant bag. Everyone should be able to have straight, sleek hair as a style option no matter their hair type, and it's well-designed styling tools like the Xtava Pro Satin that make it possible.
The contents of the box included warranty information. There was no user manual which could have provided information on the items above and would answer many of the frustrations voiced by reviewers here. Overall, I feel this flat iron is a great value. I hope Xtava plans to make a 1" infrared flat iron. That is a product I would be very interested in!

My daughter is natural with 4b/4c. Her hair is very thick plus she is tender-headed (sensitive to anyone doing her hair). I have purchased numerous of flat irons in the past but none has stood apart from the Furiden stream iron. I was quite surprised at the outcome. It was definitely worth the wait. I love the fact that it less damaging to her natural hair and it does the job well, even my friends were shocked with the results. Oh, the comb like on the flat iron was an awesome ideal. I strongly recommend this flat iron to all my natural sisters. My only regret that I did not take before and after pictures of her hair.
Ever since the early 2000’s when the planet collectively decided that straightening our hair to death was a good idea, beauty companies have been searching for a way to achieve beautiful and natural-looking straight looks without frying or unnecessary damage. From ceramic plates to protective sprays and everything in between, we have been desperately searching for some way, any way, to show off a straight head of hair that isn’t entirely made of straw.

According to hair pro Christian Wood, if you want to make sure your hair stays in the place, use the GHD gold mini styler. “I prefer a small straightener that I can get really close to the roots to remove stubborn kinks and cow licks,” says Wood. The small straightener trick is probably how he nails the beauty looks of Tessa Thompson, Emily Ratajkowski, Rosie Huntington, and Olivia Munn.
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Early hair straightening systems relied on harsh chemicals that tended to damage the hair. In the 1870s, the French hairdresser Marcel Grateau introduced heated metal hair care implements such as hot combs to straighten hair. Madame C.J. Walker used combs with wider teeth and popularized their use together with her system of chemical scalp preparation and straightening lotions.[3] Her mentor Annie Malone is sometimes said to have patented the hot comb.[4] Heated metal implements slide more easily through the hair, reducing damage and dryness. Women in the 1960s sometimes used clothing irons to straighten their hair.
Featuring the same 1.25-inch plates CHI users have loved for years, the new CHI G2 Ceramic and Titanium Flat Iron make it easier to style longer hair! If you’ve ever tried to use a non-professional hair straightener on your hair, then you know just how quickly the process can become a literal pain! From hand strain to sore wrists and arms, most hair straighteners stick to old adage of “beauty is pain.”

According to Jarman, you should never have to use both hands to clamp the iron down on your hair. You not only risk burning your fingers on the plate end, but this can pull at your hair and break it. High-quality, modern irons are designed to clamp together from the handle end only, so if you find that your iron requires pressure on both ends, it’s time to upgrade.

Automatic shutoff isn’t a feature we included in our criteria since people have varying opinions about it, but we liked that the Chi Elite has this. Especially for new users who might forget to turn off their flat irons. Like the Chi Air, the Chi Elite will shut off after one hour. However, if you’re working with kinky hair, auto shutoff may be a problem. Traditionally this hair type will take longer to straighten due to detangling and the fragility of the hair.


"Unite Pro Tools Flat Iron is an easy-to-use, low maintenance iron," says Chris Dylan. Dylan works with Kylie Jenner so finding an easy-to-use tool is a must when you’re helping someone go from a platinum blonde bob to jet black floor length extensions. in a span of a week. He notes that with a fast-heating iron and beveled edges, it creates soft waves and has a great temperature gauge that keeps you firmly in control of the heat.
Straighteners work because they have flat plates that get hot and touch together on either side of your hair. By doing that, they put heat through your hair follicles, trap in moisture and take out frizz. The plates on a flat iron can be made of several different materials, and they’re good for different uses. The best iron for you varies depending on the type of hair you have, the type of styling you want to do, and the amount of heat your hair needs.

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