This is a long review, but I want to be thorough, especially for the natural girls out there because I feel like reviews aren't specific enough for products for our hair! So far, it's definitely worth the $50. Here is a little info about myself and my hair, and my pros and cons are listed below: I am black, with natural, 4c hair and this straightener is one of the best I've had. I really wanted a steam straightener because I used to use the Chi religiously, but that severely damaged my hair. Now, I rarely use heat on my hair, and I don't plan on using this straightener more than once every 2 or 3 months. I've only used it once; I washed my hair, combed it out in the shower, put in moisturizer and heat protectant, blew it out, and then used the straightener.

Most buyers were happy with their purchase of the Xtava, loving how well it worked on their natural hair, how quickly it straightens and cuts down on style time, and the extra features like the heat resistant bag. Everyone should be able to have straight, sleek hair as a style option no matter their hair type, and it's well-designed styling tools like the Xtava Pro Satin that make it possible.

Heat stylers, such as flat irons, get a bad rap for singeing hair beyond repair, but that doesn't have to be the case. The key to preserving your hair's health while using these hot tools is passing a quality straightener over heat-protected strands without letting the heat sit on one spot too long. Speaking of stellar straighteners, here are 11 of our top picks, ya know, if you're looking to upgrade yours.
Straighteners work because they have flat plates that get hot and touch together on either side of your hair. By doing that, they put heat through your hair follicles, trap in moisture and take out frizz. The plates on a flat iron can be made of several different materials, and they’re good for different uses. The best iron for you varies depending on the type of hair you have, the type of styling you want to do, and the amount of heat your hair needs.
Creative director of GLAMSQUAD Giovanni Vaccaro prefers this flat iron by Sedu. "The ceramic plates are really key to maintain the integrity and healthiness of the hair," he says. To get expertly straight hair, Vaccaro recommends using a boar-bristle brush to help mediate frizz, and that "the follow through is key" when moving the iron and comb completely from roots to tips.

Working in sections, curl your hair. Using just the wand (and not the clamp at the bottom of the wand that "holds" the hair as it curls), wrap your section of hair around the barrel. Be sure not to overlap your hair, as this will reduce heat and result in limp sections. Use your fingers to hold the edge of the section of hair close to the barrel without burning your hair. Doing this rather than using the clamp will prevent crimps in the curls.


Crimping irons[7] or crimpers work by crimping hair in sawtooth style. The look is similar to the crimps left after taking out small braids. Crimping irons come in different sizes with different sized ridges on the paddles. Larger ridges produce larger crimps in the hair and smaller ridges produce smaller crimps. Crimped hair was very popular in the 1980s and 1990s.[citation needed]


The plates in this techy tool house an internal microchip that constantly measures and maintains an even temperature. With no random hot or cold spots, you'll get smoother, straighter, strands in fewer passes. (Spoiler alert: Fewer passes equal less damage). Adjustable temperature settings — from 260 to 410 degrees — make this ideal for any and every hair texture.
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