The HSI 1st Gen Professional Ceramic Flat Iron is designed with tourmaline-infused ceramic plates, generating negative ions and allowing smaller water molecules to penetrate into the hair shaft to reduce frizz and static. Built for durability and lasting results, the floating plates give the flexibility to flip, curl or straighten your hair – all with a single iron.
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The BaByliss Pro Nano Titanium Straightening Iron really is the Baskin Robins of hair straighteners, making it the perfect choice for anyone that wants to straighten their hair quickly. Whether you have naturally short hair and opt for extensions on occasion or you just chopped off your do’ into a new pixie cut, you will have a hard time not finding the perfect heat setting for your hair so many choices!

To solve this problem, CHI’s new G2 Ceramic and Titanium Flat Iron features a digital temperature display located right on the outside of the handle. No more knobs or dials, just buttons and electronic displays, and it is intuitive to use! This feature is great for maintaining an exact temperature during styling and also allows users of varying hair types to experience the professional-grade results CHI hair straighteners have delivered for years without the worry of damage or frying!

Early hair straightening systems relied on harsh chemicals that tended to damage the hair. In the 1870s, the French hairdresser Marcel Grateau introduced heated metal hair care implements such as hot combs to straighten hair. Madame C.J. Walker used combs with wider teeth and popularized their use together with her system of chemical scalp preparation and straightening lotions.[3] Her mentor Annie Malone is sometimes said to have patented the hot comb.[4] Heated metal implements slide more easily through the hair, reducing damage and dryness. Women in the 1960s sometimes used clothing irons to straighten their hair.
All this is so well documented and that's great! I have poker straight hair but I crave for curls and more volume all the time. I also use flat iron to curl my hair but the difference is - I'm NOT able to do this good job. But it is also damaging my hair so I'm trying some more ways to curl my hair without heat which I read here http://thelifesquare.com/how-to-curl-your-hair-85...And I must say one of them worked for me really well.
The nano ceramic plates in this straightener deliver far-infrared heat, a gentler alternative in and of itself. As if that weren't enough, there's also a reservoir where you can pour in some of the (included) argan treatment and thermal protectant, creating a conditioning steam that will strengthen and safeguard strands while you straighten. Admittedly an extra step, sure, but one that's well worth it.
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